Stigma of online dating

The data set used in that paper is publicly available, and my own re-analysis of it confirmed that if the analysis had controlled for sexual orientation, there would be that couples that met online were less likely to eventually marry.

The statistics behind the finding that the couples that met online were more likely to break up do hold up to scrutiny, but these results are certainly not the last word given the small sample of only 280 couples that met online, as compared to more than 6,000 in the study by Cacioppo and colleagues.

How can we reconcile these seemingly conflicting results?

First, the finding that couples that meet online are less likely to get married is based on an inaccurate interpretation of the data.

According to Finkel, one of the main problems with the match-making algorithms is that they rely primarily on similarity (e.g., both people are extroverts) and complementarity (e.g., one person is dominant and the other is submissive) to match people.

This data caused Ok Cupid co-founder Christian Rudder to conclude that “the mere myth of compatibility works just as well as the truth.”10 Rosenfeld, M. That average includes the good and the bad experiences of hundreds or thousands of individuals.

This time, I decided to tell her about Coffee Meets Bagel and she freaked out warning me about possible rapists and giving me a lesson on human trafficking.

Given we come from a dangerous country, I absolutely see where she is coming from; however aren't the risks of dating a stranger one met at a bar, restaurant or face-to-face as high as dating someone one met online?

Some online dating sites, such as e Harmony, use match-making algorithms, in which users complete a battery of personality measures and are then matched with “compatible” mates.

A review by Eli Finkel and colleagues found no compelling evidence that these algorithms do a better job of matching people than any other approach.

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